Falconer Businessman Says Motel Is “Catastrophe” For Village


Image by Justin Gould/WNYNewsNow.

FALCONER – A former police officer turned-business owner said something must be done about a village motel whose name has become synonymous with late-night parole checks and drug trafficking activity.

Belle-View East Owner Gary Visosky said for the last two years, a community that he loves has spiraled out-of-control, especially with the recurring events at the Budget Inn.

“Two weeks ago, there were 13 calls over there in one week,” said Visosky. “There was three calls in one day over there, and this is everyday.”



He went public Monday with his concerns at Village Hall discussing a scene last week where he witnessed a woman, whom he said was in obvious distress, bolted away from the motel and straight into the path of oncoming traffic.

“Something has to be done,” said Visosky. “Somebody has to go after the guy that owns this place.”

Last week, WNYNewsNow reported that public tax dollars are being used to house people at the motel whom are fresh out of state prison.



A law enforcement source with direct knowledge of the situation confirmed this to be the case.

“We get a parole report when they are released from prison and, a lot of times, it is marked on there that they will be housed there (Budget Inn),” said the source.

For 76-year-old Visosky, the drug activity he suspects is occurring at the Budget Inn is a sign of the times.

“If the families would do a little bit more to help these children, maybe we wouldn’t have all these criminals and drug dealers running around,” Visosky added.

He said the obvious deterioration of the Budget Inn Motel became evident to him a couple of years ago.

“It’s just sad; I don’t know what to do,” said Visosky.

WNYNewsNow Multimedia Journalist Justin Gould contributed to this report.

3 Comments

  1. The problem is that their families are the ones that taught them drug dealing. Alot of these offenders come from completely broken homes. We need better reeducation programs & skill learning in prison so they can get out and be productive members of the community. That’s what we need.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*